How to design inner play in a study narrative?

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Workshop at the Serious Play Conference in Montreal July 10-12 2019 seriousplay-montreal.com UNIVERSITÉ DU QUÉBEC À MONTRÉAL /UNIVERSITY OF QUEBEC IN MONTREAL
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  • 1. Eva den Heijer & Imara Felkers How to design in inner play in a study narrative? workshop speakers Academic Counseling & Tutoring using game principles University of the Arts Utrecht HKU University of the Arts Utrecht, the Netherlands
  • 2. ‣HKU Academic counseling & tutoring Writing a Personal Development Plan Problem: students experience these models as flat, 1 dimensional, role confirming Articulating learning goals
  • 3. ‣HKU Philosophy Substantial: a functional approach:
 - Conceived as anatomical atlas; - Man is body: limited, substance, isolable, thing, instrumental, mechanical, categories; - Normative: good, fat, stupid; - Materialistic and dualistic images of man Relational:
 - Connected to the world; - Etre au monde (Merleau-Ponty) ‘bundle of contradictions called “man”; - DaSein (Heidegger); - Commitment to the world; - Expresses itself in verbs: talking, walking, sleeping, being; - realization of meaning relations; Images of man: anthropological presumptions because we are not 1 dimensional beings… …and the reality is ambiguous.
  • 4. ‣Homo Ludens Johan Huizinga “All Art derives from Play” …so we depart from the perspective that we are the playing human being. And if all Art derives from Play, 
 then as an Art Academy we should 
 focus on Play and how we can Play
  • 5. ‣HKU Academic counseling &tutoring Writing a Personal Development Plan Idea: describing goals and ‘smart’ rules sounds like game design to me Articulating learning goals
  • 6. ‣Assumption: Play comes closer to reality than reality itself ‣Helping students how to transform their plans 
 into a system they can play ‣Helping students to give insight in their pluriformity In this method we focus on two aspects:
  • 7. ‣Helping students to give insight in their pluriformity:
  • 8. Draw your Hero Draw your sidekick Drive Rules of Play 
 design your Player Profile Aesthetics Name…… Attributes Step 1: Collect attributes to build your hero
 Step 2: Draw your hero and name it
 Step 3: Draw your sidekick in a yin-yang-style of your hero and name it Interests, hobbies, games
 Rituals Things you do Things you do but shouldn’t do Animal features Inner mantra in your mind Gender Strengths, capacities & Weaknesses Competition Chance Mimicry, roleplay Vertigo, Ilynx 1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 1. Collective Goal Step 4: What is your collective goal?
 Step 5: Think of aesthetics matching your hero and sidekick Step 6: What is your drive? Ask yourself why you do what you do, what are your values in life? 4. hku Name…… Four Categories of
 Play by Roger Callois mentioned as aesthetics daily rituals habits inner voices (Marcus Aurelius)
  • 9. Inner mantra in your mind
 through Marcus Aurelius Stoa
  • 10. What is stoa? through Marcus Aurelius StoaThe experience of looking at the stars…
  • 11. Your inner voice is a guide Active relation between
 Cosmic determinism
 and human freedom Sumpatheia

  • 12. through Marcus Aurelius Stoa Cosmos
 an immensely living creature in which all are interconnected with sumpatheia. Connected: All one alone
  • 13. Book 2 Marcus Aurelius Diary “Begin the morning by saying to thyself,
 I shall meet with the busy-body, the ungrateful, arrogant, deceitful, envious, unsocial. All these things happen to them by reason of their ignorance of what is good and evil.”
  • 14. Hey ho let’s go Poop
  • 15. NO YES
  • 16. Little game Qualities 2-5 players - Each player takes 5 cards from the deck - Taking turns everybody passes the quality that suits you least to your left player
 - Grab another card of the deck
 - Go on until you have found your 5 qualities In 3 minutes!!!
 Collecting attributes Weaknesses 2-5 players - Each player takes 5 cards from the deck - Taking turns everybody passes the weakness that suits you least to your left player
 - Grab another card of the deck
 - Go on until you have found your 5 weaknesses
 In 3 minutes!!!
  • 17. ‣Collect 5 qualities
  • 18. ‣Collect 5 weaknesses
  • 19. ‣fill out the rest of the attributes and draw your hero
  • 20. ‣fill out the rest of the attributes and draw your sidekick
  • 21. ‣Helping students how to transform their plans 
 into a system they can play:
  • 22. What is your Challenge? Personal Narrative
 Game Design Canvas 2.0 ResourcesPlay Aim Responsibility 
 Professional goal 
 Drive Feedback What is it you’ll have to learn? 
 Describe your What is it you want to become?
 Describe your Describe the goal of your game and the rules in your game in order to achieve your learning goal and 
 professional goal What are your responsibilities in the game? In what way do you stay 
 motivated to play your game? How do you know if you’re 
 playing it right? Who or what gives you 
 feedback in how you play? What is your drive? Ask yourself why you do what you do, what are your values in life? What kind of perks
 can help you? (check your player profile) Can you use a helpdesk?
 People who can help? (e.g. stakeholders) 
 Can you cheat? Take shortcuts? etc. Context Describe the context you’re in: e.g. education, subjects, teachers, etc. Boundary Conditions Describe your known limitations.
 For e.g. paying rent/mortgage, 
 need money to buy food etc. Actions Learning goal Motivators 2. hku
  • 23. What is your Challenge? Personal Narrative
 Game Design Canvas 2.0 ResourcesPlay Aim Responsibility 
 Professional goal 
 Drive Feedback What is it you’ll have to learn? 
 Describe your What is it you want to become?
 Describe your Describe the goal of your game and the rules in your game in order to achieve your learning goal and 
 professional goal What are your responsibilities in the game? In what way do you stay 
 motivated to play your game? How do you know if you’re 
 playing it right? Who or what gives you 
 feedback in how you play? What is your drive? Ask yourself why you do what you do, what are your values in life? What kind of perks
 can help you? (check your player profile) Can you use a helpdesk?
 People who can help? (e.g. stakeholders) 
 Can you cheat? Take shortcuts? etc. Context Describe the context you’re in: e.g. education, subjects, teachers, etc. Boundary Conditions Describe your known limitations.
 For e.g. paying rent/mortgage, 
 need money to buy food etc. Actions Learning goal Motivators 2. hku “I would like to reconnect with 
 my childhood creativity” EXAMPLE “I’m not feeling creative 
 anymore” “The purpose of the game is to be more in touch 
 with the child within us, 
 who is more wise than we 
 could ever know - 
 and in some circumstances 
 wiser than we are now. ” “Responsible for playing” “Whatever feelings arrive from play 
 are all correct ones, 
 as there is no wrong way to feel or think in this game. 
 When the player is mindful, 
 they will also be aware of when the feedback their 
 mind gives them feels good or not. ” “When curiosity feels infinite, then I’m playing it right”
  • 24. player profileThe player of this game is the child trapped inside the adult body. Self-consciousness and the societal expectation to "be an adult", to be "the adult", is recognized by the player (and accepted as being okay) but not allowed to be the driver of play. The player is an adult with bills to pay who in this very moment's only obligation is pure play. Accepting we are adults, with fears and worries that make us cynical, yet playing in spite of this is what makes a true player of this game. ‣Example
  • 25. Player's Guide 1. purpose of the game The purpose of the game is to be more in touch with the child within us, who is more wise than we could ever know - and in some circumstances wiser than we are now. From when we are born we see the world with "fresh eyes"; and this allows us to experience life, and not just to float through it on autopilot. Through playing this game the player can experience something again once thought forgotten, and engage in mindfulness to not only boost mood, but encourage acceptance of what we feel in our bodies and minds. 2. The Rules of the Game To not compete with children at the park. To not compare yourself to anyone else at the park. To not go on your phone, except to take one photo of your experience at the park (to remember and savor). To try to be mindful, in the "here and now". To play for as long as you want. To play in every park you see. To play with whatever however you like. To forget that germs exist. To keep playing even if you are self conscious. 3. Feedback System of the Game Often when we try to be mindful, or meditate, with a certain expectation in mind, it often has the opposite effect because it defeats the purpose of being mindful. Therefore, the feedback system of this game is simply a photo of the play. This can be a photo of a leaf, of the player playing, of the park. Whatever feelings arrive from play are all correct ones, as there is no wrong way to feel or think in this game. When the player is mindful, they will also be aware of when the feedback their mind gives them feels good or not. 4. The role of flow The role of flow in the game is connected to the feedback system, as when the player is truly mindful - no matter how they are feeling - they will experience flow, in the sense that their curiosity in the moment will be infinite. Time will pass differently, just like how children can play for hours and not realize. Colours may look different and the player might feel properly "alive" for the first time in a while. 5. Cheating in the Game The only way to cheat in this game is to sit on the bench and go on your phone. The game is designed to be as less restrictive as possible, so that players avoid the feeling that they are not playing "well", or that they are not "good" at play. In this sense, the play becomes theirs. 6. Safety in the Game The safety in the game is a childlike sense of safety. Often children who are in flow build on their flow, by trying something, and each time becoming more daring and more daring. This same approach can be taken in the game so that while fear may be there (when jumping/climbing/running), it is not at the foreground of the play. Often children who break their arm when playing were not scared, or even aware of breaking an arm prior; therefore each minute becomes a new minute to dare to explore.
  • 26. ‣Another example
  • 27. Thank you eva.denheijer@hku.nl
 imara.felkers@hku.nl evert.hoogendoorn@hku.nl
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