Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible (Syllabus for Ph.D. course; 1999).

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Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible (Syllabus for Ph.D. course; 1999).
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  Course Title and Number  : Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible (134.620) Course Instructor  : Chris A. Rollston (410-803-2629); rollston@jhu.edu Course Description and Requirements : This course is an introduction to the ancient witnesses of the biblical text and the principles of textual criticism. Class sessions will consist of reading and analyzing the primary sources;therefore, a knowledge of Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek is required. A knowledge of Latin isencouraged, but not required. Students will also be required to read and discuss the secondarysources which are assigned; during the course of the semester, some additional secondaryreadings may be assigned. Course Textbooks: Selected Bibliography Secondary SourcesBarr, James. Comparative Philology and the Text of the Old Testament. Winona: Lake: Eisenbrauns, 1987. Jellicoe, Sidney. The Septuagint and Modern Studies. Oxford: Clarendon, 1968. ______. ed. Studies in the Septuagint: Origins, Recensions, and Interpretations. NewYork: Ktav, 1974.McCarter, P. Kyle, Jr. Textual Criticism: Recovering the Text of the Hebrew Bible. Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1986.Swete, H.B. Introduction to the Old Testament in Greek. Cambridge: CambridgeUniversity Press, 1914.Tov, Emmanuel. The Text-Critical Use of the Septuagint in Biblical Research. Jerusalem: Jerusalem Biblical Studies, 3, 1981. ______. Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1992.Würthwein, Ernst. The Text of the Old Testament, 2d. ed. Grand Rapids, Mich.:Eerdmans, 1995.Primary SourcesThe standard editions of the Hebrew Bible and the Septuagint will be used. Note that theGöttingen Septuagint is a critical edition, but the Cambridge Septuagint is not; neither setis complete. The most portable Septuagint is the critical edition by A. Rahlfs,Septuaginta, id est Vetus Testamentum graece iuxta LXX interpretes. Avoid interlinear editions.Hatch, E. and H. A. Redpath. A Concordance to the Septuagint and the Other Greek   Versions of the Old Testament. Oxford: 1897-1906. Course Outline Week 1 : Introduction to Textual Criticism: The Witnesses. Read one of the following: (a)Würthwein, The Text of the Old Testament, pages 1-104; (b) Jellicoe, The Septuagint andModern Study, pages 1-25 & 176-268. Week 2 . The Origins of the Septuagint. Secondary Source Readings: Read Jellicoe, TheSeptuagint and Modern Study, pages 29-58; Gooding in Jellicoe, Studies in the Septuagint:Origins, Recensions, and Interpretations, pages 158-180. Primary Source Reading: “The Letter of Aristeas,” Cols. 9-11, 28-33; 301-311. A critical edition of the Greek Text appears in Swete, pages 531-606. For an English translation, see James Charlesworth, Old TestamentPseudepigrapha: Volume II, pages 7ff and R. H. Charles, Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of theOld Testament: Volume II, pages 89ff. During class, columns 301-311 will be read in Greek andtranslated. Week 3 . Modern Theories of the Origin of the Septuagint: The theories of Lagarde and Kahleand the theories of Cross and Talmon. Secondary Source Readings: Jellicoe, The Septuagint andModern Study, pages 59-73; Tov, Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible, pages 155-197. Tenminute reports to be prepared by individual students reading the following selections: (1) Thearticles by Cross (pages 306-320) and (2) Talmon (pages 321-400) in Qumran and the History of the Biblical Text (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1975); (3) The article by Orlinsky inJellicoe, Studies in the Septuagint: Origins, Recensions, and Interpretations, pages 239-258. Primary Source Reading: The Prologue of Ben Sira (Ecclesiasticus). During class, verses 1-35will be read in Greek and translated. Week 4 . The Revisions of Aquila, Theodotion, and Symmachus. Secondary Source Reading:Swete, Introduction to the Old Testament in Greek, pages 29-53. Primary Source Reading:Compare Dan 8:15-26 in MT, Theodotion, and the OG. Week 5 . The Revisions of Aquila, Theodotion, and Symmachus continued. Secondary SourceReadings: Jellicoe, The Septuagint and Modern Study, pages 74-99; Tov, Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible, pages 121-146. Compare Psa. 91:6b-13 in MT, LXX, and Aquila (see Swete, page 37 for Aquila). Week 6 . Origen and the Hexapla. Ten minute student report about Origen’s Hexapla. Secondary Source Readings: Jellicoe, The Septuagint and Modern Study, pages 100-133; Swete,Introduction to the Old Testament in Greek, pages 59-86. Primary Source Reading: Gen 15:1-6in the Hexapla (cf. Swete, pages 62-63). Note the existence of the compilation of the extantreadings of the Hexapla by Frederick Field, Origenis Hexaplorum quae supersunt. Week 7 . The Trifaria Varietas. Secondary Source Reading: Jellicoe, The Septuagint andModern Study, pages 134-171. Primary Source Reading: Compare 1 Kgs 18:22-28 in the MT  and Lucian (see Swete, pages 83-84 for Lucian). Week 8 . MT, Proto-MT, and the Samaritan Pentateuch. Secondary Source Reading: Tov,Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible, pages 21-121. Primary Source Reading: Compare 1 Kgs11:43-12:24 in the Greek and Hebrew traditions: The Rival Versions of Jeroboam’s Rise toPower. Student reports about the articles by Gooding in Textus 7 (1969): 1-29; Gordon in VT 25(1975): 368-393; Z. Talshir, The Duplicate Story of the Division of the Kingdom”LXX 3Kingdoms XII 24a-z (Jerusalem: Jerusalem Biblical Studies, 1989). Week 9 . The Copying and Transmitting of the Biblical Text. Secondary Source Reading: Tov,Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible, pages 199-285. Primary Source Reading: 1 Samuel 11:1-15 in MT; The Plus in 1 Samuel 11 of 4QSam a  (See Tov, Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible, page 342 for this plus); Josephus, Antiquities VI, 68-71. Time permitting, see Ulrich, TheQumran Text of Samuel and Josephus (HSM 19, 1978), 165-191 and the article by Cross (pages105-120) in the Tov (ed.) volume entitled The Hebrew and Greek Texts of Samuel (Jerusalem,1980). Week 10 . The Process of Textual Criticism. Secondary Source Reading: Tov, Textual Criticismof the Hebrew Bible, pages 287-349; On the subject of the reconstruction of a Vorlage , read thefollowing two sources: Barr, Comparative Philology, pages 238-272; Tov, “The Use of Concordances in the Reconstruction of the Vorlage  of the LXX,” CBQ 40 (1978): 29-36. Primary Source Reading: Compare Josh 20:1-6 in the MT and LXX. Week 11 . The Process of Textual Criticism. Secondary Source Reading: McCarter, TextualCriticism, pages 26-61. Primary Source Reading: Compare the MT and LXX of Judges 16:10-14and compare the MT and LXX of 1 Samuel 13:1-4. Week 12-15 . The Process of Textual Criticism. Secondary Source Readings: McCarter, TextualCriticism, 62-79. Tov, Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible, pages 350-378. Primary SourceReading: Isaiah 36-38 in Hebrew traditions and Ancient Translations (cf. also 2 Kings 18ff).
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