Human Anatomy and Physiology I: 2013F Lectures: Tue Thu 9:30-10:45 Willard Hall 007 Labs (McDowell Hall 222) 20: Mon 12:

of 21
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Information Report
Category:

Documents

Published:

Views: 36 | Pages: 21

Extension: PDF | Download: 0

Share
Description
Human Anatomy and Physiology I: 2013F Lectures: Tue Thu 9:30-10:45 Willard Hall 007 Labs (McDowell Hall 222) 20: Mon 12:20-2:15 Dan Whitney 21: Mon 2:30-4:25 Dan Whitney 22: Wed 12:20-2:15 Dan Whitney 23: Wed 2:30-4:25 Kelly Sebzda 24: Fri 8:00-9:55 Tori Haggett
Transcript
Human Anatomy and Physiology I: 2013F
  • Lectures: Tue Thu 9:30-10:45 Willard Hall 007
  • Labs (McDowell Hall 222)
  • 20: Mon 12:20-2:15 Dan Whitney
  • 21: Mon 2:30-4:25 Dan Whitney
  • 22: Wed 12:20-2:15 Dan Whitney
  • 23: Wed 2:30-4:25 Kelly Sebzda
  • 24: Fri 8:00-9:55 ToriHaggett
  • 25: Fri 10:10-12:05 Kelly Sebzda
  • 26: Fri 12:20-2:15 Kelly Sebzda
  • Run: Tue 2:05-3:00 From CSB entrance
  • Course Web Site www.udel.edu/sakai
  • William Rose rosewc@udel.edu Rust 210B, Mon 10-12
  • Dan Whitney dwhitney@udel.edu Rust 114, Mon 9:30-11:30
  • Kelly Sebzdaksebzda@udel.edu Rust 210, Thu 1-3
  • Tori Haggettvhaggett@udel.edu Rust 114, Tue 12:30-2:30
  • Department of Kinesiology and Applied PhysiologyA. & P. I: 2013F InstructorsDan Whitney Labs 20, 21, 22 Physiology of bone and adipose tissue Exercise Science, Univ. of New HampshireKelly Sebzda Labs 23, 25, 26 Exercise to prevent chronic illness (cancer, heart disease) Kinesiology (Exercise & Sports Science), Temple Univ.Tori Haggett Lab 24Rehabilitation biomecahnics and gait analysis Exercise Science, Furman UniversityWilliam Rose LecturesCardiovascular physiology, biomechanics, computer simulations in physiologyDepartment of Kinesiology and Applied PhysiologyPre-clinical Anatomy and Physiology IKAAP309-13FGrading – see syllabus.70% Classroom 65%: Eleven tests (worst is dropped) 5%: Clicker30% Laboratory 18% Group: Three simulation labs, two group projects, peer grade 12% Individual: Four lab practical examsDepartment of Kinesiology and Applied PhysiologyPre-clinical Anatomy and Physiology IKAAP309-13FUD Capture: Recording of what is projected on screen and classroom audio. http://udcapture.udel.edu/2013f/kaap309-010/Clickers: Register your clicker on Sakai.Clicker questions: 1 point for answering, 1 more point if correct.Clicker grade: Full credit if you get 75% or more of the points available. Reduced proportionally if not. No adjustments for forgotten or broken clickers, low batteries, etc.If a student is observed using more than one clicker, both clicker numbers will be noted and grades reduced for both students. Department of Kinesiology and Applied Physiology“The moment one gives close attention to anything, even a blade of grass, it becomes a mysterious, awesome, indescribably magnificent world in itself.” — Henry MillerA single word embodies the entire foundation of Western medicine. Its three letters set the tone for a distinctive world-view of healing and for the science upon which it is based... That word is see.Since Western medicine’s origins in ancient Greece some twenty-five hundred years ago, the perspective of its researchers and practitioners has been that the processes of both normal and diseased physiology must be visualizable in order to be understood in any realistic way. It is necessary, in other words, to foster a system of comprehension in which at least the mind’s eye but preferably the literal eye faithfully sees the body’s components as they are actually functioning…The Western doctor of today should be able to draw a picture of his patient’s organs, tissues, and even cells, depicting the events that are happening within them... The aim of medicine is to describe and document every step of the process by which health becomes sickness and is then restored. The history of Western medicine has been the history of its disciples at first gradually and most recently at dizzying speed uncovering in ever more minute detail the steps within those steps.The Mysteries Within. Sherwin Nuland, 2000. See …\reserve\nuland_on_seeing.doc for longer excerpt.A&P in the News
  • N.Y. Times:
  • “Weight index doesn’t tell the whole truth”
  • How measure thinness/fatness?
  • (1 , 2)
  • http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/31/health/31brod.html?ref=health
  • What is Mr Olympia’s BMI?
  • <18.5 (underweight)
  • 18.5-24.9 (normal)
  • 25-29.9 (overweight)
  • 30-40 (obese)
  • >40 (morbidly obese)
  • Department of Kinesiology and Applied PhysiologyDepartment of Kinesiology and Applied PhysiologyDepartment of Health, Nutrition, and Exercise SciencesDepartment of Health, Nutrition, and Exercise SciencesDepartment of Health, Nutrition, and Exercise SciencesDepartment of Health, Nutrition, and Exercise SciencesDepartment of Health, Nutrition, and Exercise SciencesPlanes of section, directional terms, and body regions will be discussed in the lab.Department of Kinesiology and Applied PhysiologyFigure 1.9 2Frontal planeSagittal planeTransverse planeThe major sectional planesFigure 1.9 1SuperiorLeftRightCranialProximalPosterioror dorsalAnterioror ventralLateralMedialCaudalProximalDistalThe principal directional termsDistalInferiorFigure 1.8 1Nasus or nose (nasal)Frons orforehead (frontal)Oculus oreye (orbital or ocular)Craniumor skull(cranial)Cephalonor head(cephalic)Auris or ear (otic)Cephalonor head(cephalic)Faciesor face(facial)Bucca or cheek (buccal)Cervicisor neck(cervical)Acromion(acromial)Cervicis or neck(cervical)Dorsumor back(dorsal)Oris or mouth (oral)Mentum or chin(mental)Thoracis orthorax, chest(thoracic)Axilla or armpit(axillary)Mammaor breast(mammary)Brachiumor arm(brachial)Olecranonor backof elbow(olecranal)TrunkUpperlimbAbdomen(abdominal)Antecubitisor front ofelbow(antecubital)Umbilicusor navel(umbilical)Lumbusor loin(lumbar)Antebrachiumor forearm(antebrachial)Pelvis(pelvic)Carpusor wrist (carpal)Palmaor palm(palmar)Palmaor palm(palmar)Manusor hand(manual)Gluteusor buttock(gluteal)Pollexor thumbLowerlimbDigits orphalangesor fingers (digitalor phalangeal)Inguenor groin(inguinal)Popliteus orback of knee(popliteal)Pubis(pubic)Patellaor kneecap(patellar)Femur orthigh (femoral)Crusor leg(crural)Suraor calf (sural)Tarsusor ankle(tarsal)Calcaneus orheel of foot(calcaneal)Digits or phalangesor toes (digital orphalangeal)Pes or foot(pedal)Planta orsole of foot(plantar)Halluxor great toeThe anatomical positionin anterior viewThe anatomical positionin posterior viewFigure 1.10 2 – 4THORACIC CAVITYEach lung is enclosed within a pleural cavity, linedby a shiny, slippery serous membrane called thepleura (PLOO-ra).Note theorientation ofthe section.Unless otherwisenoted, all crosssections areshown as if theviewer werestanding at thefeet of a supineperson andlooking towardthe head.Heart in pericardial cavityRight lungin rightpleural cavityLeft lungin leftpleural cavityThe body cavities:the thoracic cavity and the abdominopelvic cavityA horizontal section through thethoracic cavity shows the relationshipbetween the subdivisions of theventral body cavity in this region.The pericardial cavity is embedded within themediastinum, a mass of connective tissue thatseparates the two pleural cavities and stabilizes thepositions of embedded organs and blood vessels.BODY CAVITIESABDOMINOPELVIC CAVITYDuring development, theportion of the original ventralbody cavity extending intothe abdominopelvic cavityremains intact as theperitoneal (per-i-tō-NĒ-al)cavity, a chamber lined bya serous membrane knownas the peritoneum(per-i-tō-NĒ-um). A feworgans, such as the kidneysand pancreas, lie betweenthe peritoneal lining and themuscular wall of theabdominal cavity. Thoseorgans are said to beretroperitoneal (re-trō-per-i-tō-NĒ-al; retro, behind).DiaphragmPeritoneum (red)showing the boundariesof the peritoneal cavityThe abdominal cavitycontains many digestiveglands and organsTHORACIC CAVITYRetroperitoneal areaThe pelvic cavity containsthe urinary bladder,reproductive organs, andthe last portion of thedigestive tract; many ofthese structures lieposterior to, or inferior to,the peritoneal cavity.The diaphragm,a muscular sheet,separates the thoraciccavity from theabdominopelviccavity.ABDOMINOPELVICCAVITYSerous membranes (serosa): line body cavities. Parietal & visceral.Department of Health, Nutrition, and Exercise SciencesDepartment of Health, Nutrition, and Exercise SciencesDepartment of Health, Nutrition, and Exercise Sciences
    We Need Your Support
    Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

    Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

    No, Thanks
    SAVE OUR EARTH

    We need your sign to support Project to invent "SMART AND CONTROLLABLE REFLECTIVE BALLOONS" to cover the Sun and Save Our Earth.

    More details...

    Sign Now!

    We are very appreciated for your Prompt Action!

    x