Stoltenberg Memorial Middle School

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Stoltenberg Memorial Middle School Here at Stoltenberg Memorial Middle School we seek to create a community of all types of learners with active and creative minds. We…
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Stoltenberg Memorial Middle School Here at Stoltenberg Memorial Middle School we seek to create a community of all types of learners with active and creative minds. We seek to also create a challenging learning environment that encourages  success through developmentally appropriate instruction that facilitates individual differences and learning styles. Our school promotes a safe, orderly, caring, and supportive environment for all students. Each student's self-esteem is fostered by positive relationships with other students and staff. We strive to have our parents, teachers, and community members actively involved on our students' learning and development. TeamingWhat is the middle school teaming concept?
  • Students and teachers are divided into teams
  • Teachers work closely with the students on their team
  • Teachers teach multiple subjects
  • Core subjects are taught by the team teachers
  • Math, language arts, social studies, and science
  • What is the Team Planning Concept?
  • Utilizes collaborative teaching teams.
  • Teachers of different subject areas work together to meet the needs of a common group of students.
  • Teams work together to evaluate, plan, and implement a curriculum for their group of students.
  • Size of Team and Outcomes
  • Teams can be of different sizes
  • ~40-60 students = 2 teacher team
  • ~150-190 students = 6 teacher team
  • Factors that determine the size of the teams
  • Needs of the students
  • Socially and academically
  • Number of students per grade
  • Design of the building
  • Division of teaching responsibilities
  • Advantages of having smaller teams
  • Closer teacher-student relationships
  • Students know each other better
  • Less scheduling difficulties
  • What Characteristics Make Up an Effective Team?
  • The focus must be student-centered.
  • Academic achievement must be attained.
  • Accountability systems must be in place.
  • Collaboration and a strong sense of team community must be evident.
  • Communication with parents.
  • How to Organize a Successful Team
  • There must be sufficient individual and team planning time for teachers.
  • Teams should be manageable in terms of numbers of teacher and students.
  • Teams should have the flexibility to arrange their students’ schedules.
  • Teams should have their own designated areas in the building.
  • The teachers who make up the team should be permitted to work together for multiple years.
  • Why is Teaming Beneficial for Students?
  • Bonding within a group
  • Students’ needs can be better met
  • Organizational and time management skills are learned
  • Interdisciplinary units create motivation
  • Behavior and attendance issues can be better monitored
  • Sense of belonging
  • Rules are consistent
  • Why is Teaming Beneficial to Teachers?
  • Provides daily meeting times for teachers to:
  • monitor students’ progress
  • coordinate assignments, tests, projects
  • discuss student needs/behaviors
  • examine accountability
  • confer with parents
  • Teachers get to know their students
  • Field trips and interdisciplinary units can be carried out without missing academic instruction from other teachers.
  • Evidence of the Effectiveness of Team Teaching
  • The evidence supporting the positive impact of interdisciplinary teaming on middle grades schools and students is growing (Arhar, 1990; Arhar, Johnston, & Markle, 1989; Dickinson & Erb, 1997; Flowers, Mertens, & Mulhall, 2000; Felner, Jackson, Kasak, Mulhall, Brand, & Flowers, 1997; Flowers, Mertens, & Mulhall, 1999; George & Shewey, 1994; Lee & Smith, 1993).
  • Students and teachers in schools that have implemented teaming and its associated practices with some degree of integrity consistently report more positive and productive learning environments (Arhar 1990, 1997; Dickinson & Erb, 1997; Lee & Smith, 1993).
  • Should 5th Grade Teachers Operate as a Team?
  • Yes!
  • The team can help smooth the transition of 5th graders to the middle school.
  • Student needs can be monitored.
  • Students can bond with and feel comfortable with a core of teachers
  • Middle School Block Schedule
  • A group of students have their core classes with the same team of teachers.
  • The core class periods are usually scheduled one after the other so an academic subject can extend an activity such as a lab into the next class period and borrow time from that core teacher.
  • The block schedule allows for all grade field trips, full grade instruction, speakers for full grade, etc. with little or no disruption to other teachers .
  • Curriculum DevelopmentExploratory Programs
  • Agriculture
  • Tech Ed
  • Computers
  • FACE
  • Foreign Language (Spanish/French)
  • Business
  • Green Literacy
  • Art
  • 7th Grade Sample Schedule5th Grade Classes
  • Required:
  • English/Writing(3)
  • Math(3)
  • Science (3)
  • History(3)
  • Reading/Spelling(3)
  • Physical Education
  • General Music
  • Art
  • Computers
  • Elective:
  • Chorus on Friday
  • 6th Grade Schedule
  • Required:
  • Language Arts (3)
  • Math(3)
  • Science (3)
  • Social Studies(3)
  • Reading (3)
  • Physical Education/Health
  • Art
  • General Music
  • Exploratory/Elective:
  • Band/Chorus
  • Agriculture
  • Tech Ed
  • FACE
  • Green Literacy
  • Foreign Language
  • Computers
  • Business
  • 7th Grade Classes
  • Required
  • Language Arts (3)
  • Math(3)
  • Science (3)
  • Social Studies(3)
  • Lit and Comp(3)
  • Physical Education
  • Exploratory/Elective
  • Band/Chorus/General Music
  • Art*
  • Agriculture
  • Tech Ed
  • FACE
  • Green Literacy
  • Foreign Language
  • Computers
  • Business
  • * Art is required as one of the choices8th Grade Schedule
  • Required:
  • Language Arts (3)
  • Math(3)
  • Science (3)
  • Social Studies(3)
  • Physical Education
  • Exploratory:
  • Band/Chorus/General Music
  • Agriculture
  • Tech Ed
  • Computers
  • Foreign Language
  • Business
  • FACE
  • Green Literacy
  • Art*
  • *Art is required as one of the choicesIntegrated Curriculum
  • Education that is organize in such a way that it cuts across subject-matter lines
  • Brings together various aspects of the curriculum into meaningful association to focus upon broad areas of study
  • It views learning and teaching in a holistic way and reflects the real world, which is interactive
  • 6th grade ancient world
  • 7th grade stores
  • Integrated Programs5th grade – Animal Unit
  • Science- learning about the animal
  • Art- making the animal
  • English- researching the animal and writing a paper on the animal
  • Math- population graphing
  • Integrated Programs8th grade- Everything your heart desires
  • Math- help kids read labels and figure out the amount of calories and such in a meal.
  • English- Read poems dealing with feeling/emotions. Have them write poems about feelings/emotions
  • Health/P.E.- Inform them about heart disease. Discuss healthy choices in life, from eating and working out to drugs.
  • Music- Discuss lyrics in music about feelings, everyone pick a song.
  • Art- Make a diagram of the heart.
  • Science/History- Discuss heart transplants.
  • Green Initiatives for SMS
  • Student & Community Participation
  • Earth Day Open House, green literacy exploratory program
  • Staff Participation
  • In-service and advisory programs
  • Infrastructure
  • Compost, solar panels, plaques
  • AdvisingThe organization of a staff member and a small group of students meeting to discuss important issues.Philosophy of Advising
  • Each student has one staff member they can go to about anything
  • Staff creates an environment based on:
  • Warmth
  • Concern
  • Openness
  • Understanding
  • Effective Advising Builds
  • Social
  • Promotes communication
  • Builds peer relationships
  • Gives students roles and responsibilities
  • Improves school environment
  • Emotional
  • Gives sense of belonging
  • Builds self esteem
  • Basics
  • Who
  • Staff assigned advisory group
  • When
  • 5th/6thhave 25 minutes after lunch
  • 7th/8th have 25 minutes before lunch
  • Where
  • Any available classrooms
  • How
  • Each grade covers different themes applicable to that age group
  • 11-12 students drafted by advisor
  • Potential Advising Themes
  • Bullying
  • Organization and Study Skills
  • Think Green!
  • Team building & Communication
  • Manners
  • Self Esteem
  • Stress Management
  • TransitioningThe progression from one phase to the next. More specifically from one grade level to the next.Transitioning Support
  • Assisting students
  • Provides opportunities to thrive
  • Includes Staff, Parents, and Peers
  • Requires a listening ear
  • Effective Transitioning Builds
  • Social
  • Structure
  • Opportunities to discuss concerns
  • Friendships
  • Emotionally
  • Self confidence
  • Reduce anxiety
  • Basics
  • Where
  • The school to which they will attend
  • Who
  • Incoming 5th graders
  • Out going 8th graders
  • Parents/Staff/Community are involved to make effective
  • When
  • Semester before the transition
  • Summer
  • Advising Programing
  • 5th Grade
  • Student Survey
  • To be completed 1st February
  • School orientation
  • Peer mentors
  • School tour
  • Parent meeting
  • Address survey
  • Late April
  • 5th Grade Continued
  • Academic Fair Night
  • Performances
  • Extracurricular opportunities available
  • Address other concerns with panel
  • Late May
  • Scavenger Hunt Night
  • Week before school begins
  • Icebreakers
  • Scavenger hunt
  • Parent information
  • Changes of a middle school child
  • 8th grade
  • Survey Quiz
  • 1st of February
  • Advisee Assistance
  • Class schedule
  • Two weeks prior to scheduling classes
  • 8th grade Continued
  • Freshman Orientation Night
  • At high school
  • Middle school staff attend
  • Address student concerns and survey
  • School tour
  • High School student council members
  • 8th Grade
  • 8th Grade Field Day
  • Student organizations from high school talk
  • Extracurricular groups
  • Principle pep talk to include VP, Guidance Councilor, and School Nurse
  • How to get involved/ Importance
  • Transitioning Improvement
  • Self Study Survey
  • Completed by staff
  • Assists in reflection
  • Improvement in transitioning program
  • Student Activities and In-Service CommitteeStudent Activities
  • Activities performed by students that fall inside or outside of the normal realm of curriculum of student education.
  • Gives opportunities to build:
  • Social skills
  • Interpersonal skills
  • Self-esteem and confidence
  • Teamwork skills
  • Year Long Student Activities
  • Student Council-All Grades
  • 5th/6th Grade Student Council
  • 7th/8th Grade Student Council
  • Drama Club-All Grades
  • 7th/8th Fall Musical
  • 5th/6th Spring Play
  • Forensics in the Spring
  • Academic Olympiad-All Grades
  • Cougar Club (Community Service) –All Grades
  • Fall Student Activities
  • 7th and 8th Grades Only
  • Football (Boys)
  • Volleyball (Girls)
  • Cross-Country (Both Boys and Girls Combined)
  • Winter Student Activities
  • 7th and 8th Grades Only
  • Basketball
  • Boys: before winter break
  • Girls: after winter break
  • Gymnastics
  • Boys and Girls before winter break
  • Wrestling
  • Boys and Girls after winter break
  • Spring Student Activities
  • 7th and 8th Grades Only
  • Track and Field
  • Boys and Girls
  • In-Service for Teachers
  • An in-service committee is a group of teachers that work together and have the responsibility to professionally develop themselves and ideas
  • During in-service time teachers:
  • Investigate ideas
  • Give input
  • Learn to problem solve
  • Learn strategies to better support their students
  • Build teamwork skills
  • Summer In-Service
  • Two full days prior to the start of the school year
  • Required In-Service Activities:
  • Health and Safety Training
  • Technology Updates and Training
  • New School Policies
  • Motivational/Keynote Speaker
  • Administrative Address
  • In-Service During the Academic Year
  • Book Club
  • Technology workshops
  • SMART Board training
  • Compass Learning
  • Dragon Dictation
  • Educational Websites
  • Incorporating the Green Initiative into the school
  • Decrease paper usage
  • Monitor utilities
  • Eco-friendly products
  • Renewable energy sources
  • Additional In-Service Activities
  • Diversity Training
  • Students with Disabilities
  • Students of diverse cultures and ethnicities
  • Scheduling
  • State Testing Preparation and Score Analysis
  • State Education Conventions
  • Transitioning
  • Assisting teachers in the process of converting from a junior high school to a middle school format
  • Resources:
  • CEYA-Center of Education for the Young Adolescent
  • On UW-Platteville campus
  • AMLE-Association of Middle Level Education
  • Visits to other middle schools for helpful ideas
  • Academic Research
  • In-Service for Teachers
  • Conflict Resolution:Activities, Policy, and Strategies for Behavioral ChangeShane KielerGroup 4:Conflict Resolution, Peer Mediation, and Health & FitnessThe Courage Retreat
  • Length: 5 - 5.5 hours
  • Acting with Courage
  • Fear–Following the Crowd
  • Courage–Following your Heart
  • The Pebble In the Pond
  • http://www.youthfrontiers.org/programs/courage/
  • The Courage Callback
  • Length: 50 minutes
  • Remind students of retreat
  • Students keep their Acts of Courage pledges
  • Outline of Bullying Policy
  • Consequences
  • Strategies for Behavioral Change
  • Strategies for Environmental Change
  • Examples of Consequences Strategies for Behavioral Change
  • Framing the aggressive behavior as a failed attempt to solve a real problem or reach a goal.
  • Restitution and restoration
  • Transformative conferencing/restorative justice practices
  • Supervised peer support group
  • Corrective instruction or other relevant learning or service experience
  • Supportive discipline to increase accountability for the bullying offense
  • Supportive interventions, including participation of an Intervention and Referral Services team, peer mediation, etc.
  • Other Strategies for Behavioral Change
  • Behavioral assessment or evaluation, including, but not limited to, a referral to a Child Study Team, as appropriate
  • Behavioral management plan, with benchmarks that are closely monitored
  • Involvement of school disciplinarian
  • Student counseling
  • Parent conferences
  • Student treatment
  • Student therapy
  • Peer Mediation at Stoltenberg Memorial Middle School?A consideration of using peer mediation as a conflict resolution methodHistory
  • Teaching Students to be Peacemakers (1960’s)
  • First Peer Mediation program.
  • Taught the students how to deal with and mediate conflicts.
  • Children’s Creative Response to Conflict (1972)
  • Taught all students that the power of nonviolence lies in justice, caring, and personal integrity.
  • Current style of peer mediation programs began in early 1980’s.
  • Peer Mediation Process
  • Step 1: Agree to mediate, make introductions, state ground rules.
  • Step 2: Gather Information by asking each person what happened, ask each person if they want to add anything.
  • Step 3: Focus on common interest, determine and summarize shared interest.
  • Peer Mediation Process
  • Step 4: Create options by brainstorming solutions and asking disputants what can be done to resolve the problem.
  • Step 5: Evaluate options and choose a solution, again ask the disputants what they feel the best resolution would be.
  • Step 6: Write out the agreement for each of the students to sign, have them shake hands.
  • How would it be ran at Stoltenberg?
  • An adult supervisor would be present in every mediation.
  • Peer mediation would most likely take place during advisory.
  • The group of mediators would consist of seventh and eighth grade students only.
  • Mediators would have to apply for the position and then go through an interview process.
  • Example of Peer Mediation
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PxCLtFWB74E
  • Clip starts at (1:39)
  • Advantages to Peer Mediation
  • A recognition that only the parties choose to resolve conflicts, not forced reconciliation
  • Parties must feel comfortable in order to work out differences, trust and respect must be fostered between disputants
  • An open exchange of information
  • Advantages Cont’
  • Acknowledgement that the parties are ultimately the best judge of a resolution to a conflict and understanding that implementation of a resolution is more likely if it has been crafted by the disputants
  • Does it really work?
  • A vast majority of peer mediation programs report a resolution success rate between 80 and 95 percent.
  • Around 85 to 95 percent of resolutions remained successful
  • Suspensions for fighting decreased between 45% and 70% at five New York City high schools during the first year of a peer mediation program.
  • At a high school in Minneapolis suspensions decreased by 55% and suspensions specifically for violent behavior decreasing 52%
  • Opposition
  • Some conflicts are not appropriate for peers to settle.
  • Quite often there is a lack of training of the mediators due to time constraints.
  • Other students tend to think of mediators as police officers and dislike them.
  • Opposition
  • Often mediators are rotated through after one semester or one year not allowing them to improve through repeated practice.
  • Some students will choose peer mediation as the easy way out and not reap any benefits.
  • Decision
  • At this point in time we are not ready to say yes or no to a peer mediation program. The administration will continue to research all the options and facts and make a decision within the next year.
  • Sources
  • Cohen, R. (1995). Students Resolving Conflict. New York: GoodYearBooks.
  • Emerson, J. (1990). Conflict Resolution for Students: A Study of Problem Solving and Peer Conflict Management. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Oregon, Eugene.
  • http://wik.ed.uiuc.edu/index.php/Peer_Mediation
  • http://www.studygs.net/peermed.htm
  • http://www.lassd.org/peer_mediation.htm
  • Health and FitnessFollowing the USDA guidelines for a healthy meal is our main objective Each meal will consist of the appropriate caloric value based on the specific food group. Example Meal
  • Catch of the Day
  • Fish-shaped tuna sandwich with lettuce on whole wheat bread
  • 10 baby carrots with 2 tablespoons ranch dip
  • Small plum
  • 1/4 cup whole-grain Goldfish crackers
  • Milk Choice
  • FitnessIntramurals
  • Wide variety of organized sports
  • Focus on students ne
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